Modibo

Combretum erythrophyllum

River Bushwillow, Vaderlandswilg (Afr.), Umdubu

1 of 4
1 of 4
The River willowbush is found along riverbanks in Southern Africa. It has also become popular as a garden tree in South Africa and the United States, due to its yellow-cream flowers and hardened nature. Giraffe, elephant and and antelope enjoy its leaves, while its wood, gum, roots and fruits have various practical uses, from medicine to dye and varnish. ZA Distribution: Eastern Cape, Free State, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, North West, Northern Cape.
Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Summer, Spring

Fruiting time

Autumn

Harvesting

Generally not harvested.

Propagation

Seed

Soak fresh seeds in water for some hours before planting. Seedlings should appear within two weeks of being planted.

Special features

Attracts birds

Birds such as the Southern Black Tit are known to eat the fruit, especially to access the insects inside.

Drought resistant

The hardened nature of the River bushwillow make it popular in arid areas.

Autumn colour

Leaves colour in hues of red, orange and yellow during autumn.

Attracts butterflies

Attractive flowers

Special features

Origin

Southern Africa Zimbabwe, Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa, Swaziland and Zambia. South Africa: Eastern Cape, Northern Cape (along the Orange river).

Natural climate

Temperate

Environment

Light

Full Sun, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Loam, Compost, Sand, Clay

Soil PH preference

Neutral

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Medicinal

The roots are used as a purgative or cleanser, as well as for treating venereal diseases. The bark is sometimes mixed with other herbs to make a healing tea to treat sores.

Personality

Family

Combretaceae

Flower colour

Cream, Yellow, Green

Scent

Mild

Problems

Wasps often lay their eggs inside the fruits, where newly hatched larvae feed on the fruits. Birds enjoy pecking these insects from inside the fruits.

Credits

profile iconCombretum erythrophyllum
by Lou-Nita Le Roux, Lowveld National Botanical Garden, June 2003 (Copyright South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa)
Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Knowledge and advice

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play