Red-And-Green Cobra Lily

Chasmanthe bicolor

Two-Colour Chasmanthe, Two-Colour Cobra Lily, Suurkanol, Suurkanolpypie (Afr.)

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This species is a winter growing ornamental, and as the name suggests, can be identified from other Chasmanthe varieties by its two coloured flowers. Once it's planted in the backdrop of any garden, it tends to accentuate other smaller species in front of it. When it is planted, it prefers not to be disturbed for several years. ZA Distribution: Western Cape.
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Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Winter, Spring

Fruiting time

Summer

Harvesting

Pick flowers in the winter months to create beautiful winter arrangements. Harvest seeds after flower in Spring and store until Autumn.

Propagation

Seed

This species's seed viability varies as this plant grows better by division of the corms.

Division

Breaking up of the corms during the dormant period is the ideal time. Although it will continue to bloom for years without division, dividing clumps every three to four years will increase flowers.

Special features

Attracts birds

The Two-colored Cobra Lily attracts nectar drinking sunbirds.

Drought resistant

This plant has a dormant period during the summer months and re-emerges in Autumn. Ideal for xeriscaping in a winter rainfall area.

Wet sites

Thrive in wetlands, even when areas go dry in summer.

Pot plant

Special features

Origin

Eastern and Western Cape, South Africa

Natural climate

Winter rainfall areas in Temperate zones.

Environment

Light

Full Sun, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Clay, Loam, Sand

Soil PH preference

Acid, Neutral

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Ornamental

This plant can be used to bring much needed colour to those difficult semi-shaded areas in the garden. It can also be used as a container plant.

Personality

Family

Iridaceae

Flower colour

Red, Yellow, Green, Multicoloured, Orange

Scent

Mild

Problems

This plant doesn't have many pests or diseases, but it tends to struggle in the wild, as it grows better in cultivation.

Companion plants

Credits

profile iconChasmanthe bicolor
by Bernard Martin Brown, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, April 2008. Updated by Alice Notten July 2011 (Copyright South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa)
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Knowledge and advice

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
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