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A picture of a Black Mustard

Black Mustard

Brassica nigra

Also known as

Mustard, Swart Mostert (Afr.)

Full Sun
Easy care
Moderate watering
Half-hardy

10a

USDA zone

-1°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

1.5m

Max

1.5m

30cm

Min

50cm

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

This plant has no fragrance

More images

A photo of Black Mustard
A photo of Black Mustard
A photo of Black Mustard
A photo of Black Mustard
A photo of Black Mustard

Overview

Black Mustard is known as Brassica nigra. It is an annual herb that can be grown easily and is famous as a spice and for large fields of pretty yellow flowers. Although all parts of Black Mustard are edible, it is cultivated mainly for its seeds. It belongs to the same family as broccoli and cabbage. In vineyards, mustard is planted as a cover crop that sterilises the soil from plant patogens. This plant grows up to 2m and is multi-branched. The lower leaves are toothed, deeply lobed, and are often hairy on the underside. Upper leaves on flowering stems are narrow, slightly waxy and egg-shaped. Black mustard seeds have the strongest pungent taste, but almost no aroma.

Common problems

Black mustard is the least fussy of the mustards, and weeds might be your worst enemy. They can however be plagued by Black Spot, Black Rot, Cabbage Aphid, Downy Mildew, Flea Beetles,

Harvesting

When the leaves turn yellow and as soon as the seed pods brown, seeds may be harvested. Waiting too long will cause the pods to burst and seeds to scatter all over your garden.

Propagation

Seed

Seeds are tiny, so sow in a well prepared, flat seed bed. Sow in Spring - they prefer cool weather; Sowing depth - 1.2 cm; Germination time - 14-21 days.

Special Features

Crop rotation

An excellent rotation for wheat and seed potato crops.

Uses

Culinary.

culinary