Swamp Bush Lily

Clivia robusta

Swamp Clivia, Bush Lily, Boslelie (Afr.)

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Clivia robusta or swamp clivia is the largest growing member of the Clivia family and can reach over 1.5 m high in ideal conditions, but usually,​ will grow to about 1 m tall. The name ‘robusta’ is in reference to the robust nature of this species, and it also resembles a robust form of the species, Clivia gardenii. It is a strong grower and is said to be more tolerant of sun and over-watering than most other Clivia. They have the ability to grow near, or in running or pools of water and can handle poorly draining soils while other clivias can’t, but it also does well in well-drained soils. Clivia robusta makes an ideal easy-care, eye-catching plant for your garden all of your visitors will be asking what it is. ZA Distribution: Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal.

Planning

Difficulty

Moderate

Flowering time

Autumn, Winter, Spring

Fruiting time

Autumn, Winter

Harvesting

Harvest seed from the berries when they turn red and sow immediately without allowing the seed to dry, just covering the seed. Seeds germinate within 4 weeks.

Propagation

Seed

Harvest seed from the berries when they turn red and sow immediately without allowing the seed to dry.

Special features

Attractive fruits

Attractive leaves

Pot plant

Attracts birds

Indoor plant

Wet sites

Attractive flowers

The orange-red pendulous flowers with pronounced green tips vary in colours from baby pink to deep red and are similar to C. gardenii.

Special features

Origin

South Africa, Pondoland

Natural climate

Coastal sub-tropical

Environment

Light

Full Shade, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Wet

Soil type

Loam, Sand

Soil PH preference

Neutral, Acid

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Personality

Family

Amaryllidaceae

Flower colour

Yellow, Orange, Green

Scent

None

Problems

Slugs and snails are a problem, particularly when the flower buds start appearing. Other pests are mealybugs, amaryllis caterpillar, scale, and snout beetle which all need to be eliminated by spraying with a suitable insecticide.

Companion plants

Credits

profile iconClivia robusta
by John Winter, Kirstenbosch NBG, July 2007 (Copyright South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa)