French Tarragon

Artemisia dracunculus var. sativa

Tarragon, Estragon

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Tarragon is a cold-sensitive perennial with a distinct sweet anise flavor. French tarragon is the variant used as aromatic culinary herb and grows and spreads slowly fro tangled underground rhizomes. What makes this plant unique is that during growth, it seems to have little aroma, yet after the leaves are harvested, the oils concentrate and start emitting their unique tarragon smell. The wild tarragon is not as fragrant, while the Russian tarragon is mild too.
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Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Summer, Autumn, Spring

Fruiting time

Summer, Autumn

Harvesting

Leaves can be harvested throughout the growing season. Not suitable for drying. Can be harvested and frozen in cubes.

Propagation

Division

The roots should be lifted and divided every two years. Root division are easily made at underground nodes.

Cuttings

Root stem cuttings in moist sand. Allow four weeks for the stems to root. Set plants 45- 60 cm apart and space rows 60 - 90 cm apart.

Seed

Tarragon rarely flowers, so growing from seed is not recommended. Tarragon seed is often sterile.

Special features

Pot plant

French tarragon can be grown easily in a container 30 cm wide and deep. Tarragon can also be grown in hanging baskets.

Special features

Origin

Eurasie

Natural climate

Warm to temperate

Environment

Light

Full Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Loam

Soil PH preference

Neutral

Frost hardiness

Half-Hardy

Uses

Medicinal

Tarragon has a mild anesthetic property when used medicinally.

Edible

It flavors sauces (in traditional béarnaise sauce it is an essential ingredient). It is particularly good with shellfish, fish, chicken, and turkey.

Notes

Culinary

Personality

Family

Asteraceae

Flower colour

Green

Scent

None

Problems

Tarragon are susceptible to root rot so avoid over watering. Avoid planting French tarragon where water collects or where leaves are slow to dry. Tarragon is susceptible to downy mildew, powdery mildew, and root rot where the soil or plants stay wet.

Related Problems

Companion plants

Eggplant, sweet peppers and gooseberries
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Knowledge and advice

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
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