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White Mustard

Sinapis alba

Also known as

Mosterd (Afr.)

Full Sun
Easy care
Moderate watering
Half-hardy

10a

USDA zone

-1°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

50cm

Max

90cm

30cm

Min

70cm

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

This plant has a mild fragrance

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White Mustard Overview

White Mustard, also known as Sinapis alba and previously as Brassica alba and Brassica hirta. This plant is part of the cabbage family and is grown mainly for its seeds and as a green manure. It is a cool-season, hardy annual that will suppress other weeds if grown in mass. White Mustard seeds are mixed with Black Mustard seed to make English mustard.

Common problems with White Mustard

White Mustard Companion Plants

How to harvest White Mustard

Sprouts can be harvested within 8 - 10 days after sowing. Seed pods must be picked before they open. Mustard flowers are also edible.

How to propagate White Mustard

Seed

Sow in situ from early spring to late summer and thin out later. Germination in about a week.

Special features of White Mustard

Crop rotation

When ploughed back into the ground, it improves the soil in orchards and vineyards by providing nitrogen to the earth (green manure).

Other uses of White Mustard

Culinary

Medicinal

The same properties as with Brassica nigra, but less potent. Seldom used internally in the West, but popular in the East for treatment of coughs, arthritis, fungus and as a poultice.

Edible

Seeds produce oil, spice and flour, which is used in herbal medicine. Young leaves and sprouted seeds used in salads. Used for animal feed, but NOT after it has flowered and developed fruit.

Green manure

Used as a green manure as it is fast growing to cover your soil.