Wild Pomegranate

Burchellia bubalina

Wildegranaat (Afr.), Mahlosana

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Beautiful evergreen shrub to small tree with bright orange to red flowers in clusters. The flowers are rich in nectar and attrack birds and insects to the garden. It is part of the coffee tree family, Rubiaceae. The glossy green leaves with grey underneath makes a neat addition to smaller gardens. It grows naturally in sandy areas in forests, but thrive in gardens in full sun too. It was named after W.J. Burcell an explorer visiting South Africa in the 1800's ZA Distribution: Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Western Cape.
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Related Plants

Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Summer, Spring

Fruiting time

Autumn

Harvesting

Pick seeds as soon as mature and sow fresh.

Propagation

Seed

Grows easily from fresh seed collected in Spring after flowering. Sow in well-draining medium. It should germinate in 4-6weeks.

Cuttings

Easily propagated from cuttings too; keep moist until rooted.

Special features

Attracts birds

Nectar-loving birds visit when in flower!

Attracts useful insects

Bees are butterflies are attracted tot he flowers.

Pot plant

Use a big pot that drains well.

Hedge plant

Make a thick green covering to form informal hedge.

Special features

Origin

Africa, Coastline from South western Cape to Swaziland.

Natural climate

Coastal

Environment

Light

Full Shade, Full Sun, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Loam, Compost

Soil PH preference

Neutral

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Ornamental

This is a neat and attractive ornamental subject for most gardens. With the flowers containing sweet nectar, it is also good for attracting birds to the garden. When the tree is in full bloom, it bears a superficial resemblance to the true pomegranate, hence the common name, wild pomegranate.

Personality

Family

Rubiaceae

Flower colour

Orange, Red

Scent

None

Problems

Problem free

Companion plants

Credits

profile iconBurchellia bubalina
by Mhlonishwa David Dlamini, Walter Sisulu National Botanical Gardens, February 2005 (Copyright South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa)
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Knowledge and advice

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