Large Meadow Mining Bee

Andrena labialis

Large Meadow Mining Bee

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Andrena labialis, or the Large Meadow Mining Bee, is a bee that's somewhat restricted in its range. This may partly be due to the loss of meadow habitat in the UK, coupled with pesticide use in agriculture. These insects thrive in farmland, woodland rides, abandoned quarry sites and hedgerows habitats with an abundance of clover and wildflowers. It's likely they can improve crop yields when in abundance.
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Traits

These bee's are excellent pollinators in wildflower meadows.
These bees have experienced declines in recent years due to habitat loss.

Appearance

Females: Slightly smaller than a honeybee. They possess a red-auburn pile of hair on the thorax; paired with a slightly shiny, black, hairless abdomen. There's duller, yellow hairs on the legs, which are the apparatus used to collect pollen. Males: The hairs on the male's thorax are more chocolate brown. The males slightly smaller than the females, too. They also possess yellow markings on the face. Larvae and Eggs: Rarely seen by gardeners because they spend the entirety of development in the nest.

Activity

Diurnal

Personality

Order

Hymenoptera

Family

Andrenidae

Metamorphosis

Complete

Distribution

The UK and Ireland and some parts of Europe.

Biological treatment

It's not recommended to treat gardens with Andrena bees.

Chemical treatment

These bees are top pollinators; ideally, they shouldn't be removed.

Attracts

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Knowledge and advice

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