Wolf Spider

Lycosidae

Wolf Spider

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Hogna lenta 18 by Patrick Edwin Moran (CC BY-SA 3.0)
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A spider Araneae belonging to the wolf spider family Lycosidae
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Hogna lenta 18 by Patrick Edwin Moran (CC BY-SA 3.0)
1 of 7
Lycosidae derives from the ancient Greek word for wolf (λύκος) because once it was thought they hunted in groups, like a wolf pack! But they're actually solitary hunters. Many mistake Wolf Spiders for tarantulas; however, both these spiders live very different lifestyles. Wolf Spiders will actively hunt and pursue their prey. They have excellent vision to facilitate the style of hunting, perceiving the environment in almost 360-degrees. See them basking on rocks in the sun, in the grass or the nooks of patios and decking. They're quick, tiny, and their colouring makes them beautifully camouflaged, so they can easily go unnoticed.
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Traits

A spider is consumes roughly 15 small insects per day.

Appearance

Adults: Almost trantula-like. They're hairy spiders with variable markings of brown, black, grey and white.

Activity

Diurnal

Personality

Order

Araneae

Family

Lycosidae

Distribution

Worldwide

Biological treatment

Wolf spiders can be used as a natural form of biocontrol in the garden. Encourage them to your green spaces by using bug friendly habitats, mow less frequently and leave parts of the garden to become a little wild!
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Knowledge and advice

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