A picture of a Scots Pine

Scots Pine

Pinus sylvestris

Also known as

Archangel Redwood, Baltic Redwood, Bish Apples, European Turpentine, Norway Fir, Red Deal, Scotch Fir, Scots Fir, Scotch Pine, Yellow Deal

Pinus sylvestris, Larvik, Norway by Arnstein Rønning (CC BY 3.0)

Full Sun
Light watering
Frost Hardy

6a

USDA zone

-23°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

35m

Max

10m

12m

Min

8m

50 years to reach maturity

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

More images of Scots Pine

Pinus sylvestris stożki wzrostu 611
Pinus sylvestris Nethybridge
A photo of Scots Pine
A photo of Scots Pine
A photo of Scots Pine

Scots Pine Overview

Pinus sylvestris is more commonly known by the names Scots Pine and Baltic Redwood, amongst others. It originates from Eurasia and grows naturally in poor, sandy soils. It is a large , evergreen conifer from the Pinaceae family. It forms slim, twisting, greyish to blue-green, needle-like leaves in pairs. The bark is orange-brown to grey in colour with a scaley texture and stems are green-brown, without hairs. Non-showy flowers may be yellow or red-purple, appearing in clusters in spring. Following wind pollination, the female flowers develop into green cones, ripening to grey-brown. The cones measure around 5cm long and take a season to mature, staying on the tree during that time. Plant in well-draining soil, in full sun. This species can cope with some drought and is very hardy.

Common problems with Scots Pine

How to propagate Scots Pine

Seed

Cuttings

Evergreen current growth cuttings in autumn to spring. Deciduous softwood cuttings in summer.

Special features of Scots Pine

Attractive leaves

Other uses of Scots Pine

Specimen bark. Year-round interest. Suitable for coastal conditions.