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A picture of a Cranberry

Cranberry

Vaccinium macrocarpon

Also known as

Bearberry, American Cranberry

Photo by Willowherb (All rights reserved)

Partial Shade
Advanced care
Frequent watering
Frost Hardy

6a

USDA zone

-23°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

30cm

Max

2m

20cm

Min

1m

Fruiting

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

Commercially harvested by flooding the bog bed area and take the floating berries out. Harvesting by hand is labour intensive and done when the berries are dark red.

Cranberry Overview

Cranberries grow wild in Northern America, Canada and Northern Asia. It is a creeping perennial vine that flourish in sandy marshlands. It was used as food and medicine by native Americans, but entered the food world in end of 20th century and the most berries are produced in Massachussetts. Although difficult to grow it is available as dried food all over the world.

Common problems with Cranberry

How to propagate Cranberry

Layering

Remove a growing plant to the new sand bog bed. Cover some of the vines with sand to allow new roots to form and cut off the new plant after roots a established.

Cuttings

You can propagate by division or from semi-ripe cuttings.

Division

Seed

Seed in autumn.

Special features of Cranberry

Wet sites

Grow in marshy wetlands close to the sea.

Other uses of Cranberry

Grown for their foliage, autumn colour (on deciduous species) flowers and fruits, often edible.

Medicinal

Berries are excellent for urinary infections. The high antioxidant content is due to anthocyanidins present and help with preventing heart disease, cancer and many other serious diseases.

Edible

Fruits are edible and usually supplied dried. Soak overnight in pear or apple juice to swell or serve dried as snack. High in vit. C, potassium, manganese, copper, zinc, iron and phenols.