Begonia

Begonia spp.

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1 of 37
Begonia is a large, diverse genus with over 1,600 distinct species, featuring a wide variety of leaf structures, colours and textures, and a varied range of flower forms that come in many different - often vivid - shades. They can be grown outdoors in cooler climates, and are also great indoor plants. In warmer climates, they can be grown in shady areas. The flowers are edible and can add interest to many dishes.

Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Spring, Summer, Autumn

Fruiting time

Autumn

Harvesting

Harvest the divided tubers during the dormant period (winter) and replant in the spring.

Propagation

Division

Division of the tubers during the dormant period (winter) and replant in the spring. Space the plants 15 cm apart from each other.

Cuttings

Take softwood cuttings of about 10cm and root in a glass of water.

Special features

Attractive leaves

Attractive flowers

Flowers come in extremely vivid colours, except in blue and green. Red, white, pinks and purple are most common.

Pioneer

Pot plant

They work very well when planted in hanging baskets and containers.

Special features

Origin

The ancestors of the common hybrids originate from the slopes of the Andes.

Natural climate

Mountain forests

Environment

Light

Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Loam, Compost

Soil PH preference

Neutral, Acid

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Personality

Family

Begoniaceae

Flower colour

Purple, Red, Multicoloured, White, Pink, Orange

Scent

None

Problems

Aphids, spider mites, scale and snout beetles may attack this plant. A simple cure is to spray the affected areas with a little dishwashing liquid, mixed with water, in a spray bottle (make routine sprays if the pests are persistent). Prevent powdery mildew by spraying with a registered fungicide.

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