Top Five Trees to Plant in Your Garden

CommunityForestTrust
Published on December 3rd 2020
16
An infographic of the top five trees you can plant in your garden
As part of our #TreeInspired campaign our partners, The Community Forest Trust, have shared their top five suggestions for trees you can plant in your garden!

Why plant a tree in your garden?

As well as making your garden more visually attractive, trees will provide a huge range of environmental benefits from locking up carbon to improving air quality. They are especially important in urban areas as not only help connect us to nature but provide both food and habitats for wildlife.

Choosing a suitable location

It is recommended that trees are planted away from fences and built structures to avoid shading of buildings and damage by roots. If you are renting your property, make sure you agree with your landlord on what to plant and where and, where possible, check any below-ground service plans before digging so you don’t disturb any pipes or cables.
A man planting a tree in the ground

Planting your tree

Bare root and root ball trees should ideally be planted between November and early March, while containerised trees can be planted at any time of the year. Your tree should be planted deep enough so that soil will cover just above where the roots begin and with sufficient space around the tree to allow it to grow unhindered. You may also want to use planting accessories, such as stakes and mulch mats, to give your trees some extra ‘tree-LC’!
You can find out more and get some handy tips from our resident garden expert, Alan Down.

Top five trees to plant in your garden

A beautiful small tree with gorgeous flaking bark which curls back to reveal more cinnamon- coloured bark beneath. It also had a rich autumn foliage colour.
This photo shows the fork in the trunk of a paperbark maple tree (Acer griseum)
A small, rounded deciduous thorny tree with lobed, glossy leaves. Flowers fully double, light red.
Vivid pink blossom on a decorative hawthorn tree. Paul's Scarlet (Crataegus laevigata)
A deciduous tree, with brilliant white bark on the trunk and larger branches; ovate leaves turn yellow in autumn; yellow-brown male catkins open in early spring.
Himalayan Birch - Betula utilis var. jaquemontii
Profuse white spring flowers before the bronze-tinted young leaves emerge. Good autumn leaf tints.
Serviceberry 'Ballerina'
Image: BlueCanoe. License: CC BY-SA 3.0
This has white flowers in late spring. Pale yellow fruits mature to amber-yellow are complemented by rich autumn foliage colour of red, orange and purple.
A close up of a fruit tree
Top tip – Your local tree nursery or garden centre and they should be able to advise you on the type and variety that suits your needs. They should also be able to tell you how and where your tree was grown; as well any biosecurity precautions they take in preventing the spread of pest and diseases.zz
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