Fennel

Foeniculum vulgare

Common Fennel, Fenkell, Finckle, Finkel, Sabbath Day Posy, Aniseed-Weed, Sweet Fennel

1 of 2
1 of 2
Fennel can be grown as an ornamental or as a culinary herb. With its finely divided foliage and attractive yellow flowers, it encourages all kinds of wildlife to a garden from pollinators such as bees and butterflies to birds that eat the seed. Fennel has a strong aniseed flavour that is used in a variety of food products including soups and pesto and the seeds can be used in curries.
Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Planning

Difficulty

Moderate

Flowering time

Summer

Fruiting time

Autumn

Harvesting

Bulbs can be harvested 20 days after earthing up. Cut the bulb at the base to encourage regrowth.

Propagation

Seed

Sow in early spring in situ for best results. Seeds require a light covering of soil and to be spaced around 30 cm apart.

Division

Divide in March as the new growth emerges.

Special features

Attracts butterflies

Attracts bees

Attracts birds

Attracts useful insects

Repels harmful insects

Repels aphids

Special features

Origin

Mediterranean

Environment

Light

Full Sun, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Chalk, Clay, Loam, Sand

Soil PH preference

Neutral, Alkaline, Acid

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Edible

The seeds are used as a spice whereas the shoots and bulbs are used as a vegetable.

Personality

Family

Apiaceae

Flower colour

Yellow

Scent

Strong

Companion plants

Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Knowledge and advice

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play