A picture of a Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Beta vulgaris (Cicla Group) 'Green Lucullus'

Full Sun
Easy care
Moderate watering
Tender

H7-H1c

RHS hardiness

-20°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

60cm

Max

40cm

30cm

Min

30cm

2 years to reach maturity

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

This plant has no fragrance

More images of Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

A photo of Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'
A photo of Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus' Overview

Beta vulgaris 'Green Lucullus' (Cicla Group) is an edible leafy vegetable that you can use in your cooking. The leaf and the stem are usually prepared separately, both parts having high nutrients levels, so are great to eat as part of a healthy diet. They have a similar flavour to spinach. It is quite an easy plant to grow and can be left in the ground over winter which can give you early crops in the next spring.

Common problems with Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus' Companion Plants

How to harvest Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

The outer leaves should be cut off first when they are still young and tender. Work your way into the centre leaves. You do not have to wait until they are fully grown as harvesting them regularly will encourage them to supply new growth. Raw chard is extremely perishable.

How to propagate Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Seed

The seeds should be sown thinly, around 2.5cm deep and 10cm apart. This should be done from March to July. Usually, you do two separate sowings, so one in April and another in July. The July crop will provide leaves for the following spring when they start to grow again.

Special features of Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Crop rotation

Swiss Chard is a heavy feeder, follow these crops with legumes.

Other uses of Swiss Chard 'Green Lucullus'

Cooking

Fresh young chard can be used raw in salads. Mature chard leaves and stalks are typically cooked or sautéed; the bitterness fades with cooking, leaving a refined flavour which is more delicate than that of cooked spinach.