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A picture of a Morning Glory

Morning Glory

Convolvulus spp.

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Also known as

Bindweed, Field Bindweed

Convolvulus arvensis 01 by-dpc by David Perez (CC BY 3.0)

Full Sun
Easy care
Moderate watering
Frost Hardy

H4

RHS hardiness

-10°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

3m

Max

3m

2m

Min

50cm

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

This plant has no fragrance

More images of Morning Glory

Some pink Convolvulus flower on a plant
A close up of a white Convolvulus flower
A close up of some Convolvulus leaves
A close up of a white Convolvulus flower

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GardeningExpress

Convolvulus cneorum - Convolvulus - Silver Bush

£21.94

Morning Glory Overview

Convolvulus is a genus of about 200-250 species of flowering plants, they are annual or perennial herbaceous vines, bines and some woody shrubs. Many species are invasive weeds but others are grown in gardens for their flowers, while a few are threatened species. Convolvulus arvensis (Field bindweed) is an invasive species throughout South Africa, problematic in cultivated fields. Convolvulus boissieri, C. cneorum, C. sabatius and C. tricolor are species cultivated for use in gardens.

Common problems with Morning Glory

Susceptible to aphids and red spider mites.

How to harvest Morning Glory

Seed can be harvested when the seed capsule has turned brown.

How to propagate Morning Glory

Seed

Sow seeds in spring or autumn.

Division

Divide perennials in spring.

Cuttings

Root soft wood cuttings in late spring or greenwood cuttings in summer.

Special features of Morning Glory

Pot plant

Grows well in containers.

Drought resistant

Other uses of Morning Glory

Used in borders, ground cover and hanging baskets.

Common Weeds

A weed is a plant in the wrong place, these are the most likely to appear where they are not wanted.

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Flowers - Annuals to direct sow in September

There is still time to direct sow these hardy annuals where you want them to flower next spring.

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