Endive

Cichorium endivia

Cultivated Endive, Escarole, Curly Endive

1 of 3
1 of 3
With its crisp texture and its sweet, nutty flavor, Endive is well-renowned throughout the culinary world. It is a robust lettuce-like, leafy herb with a pleasantly mild bitterness and it is rarely aloud to flower in order to be blanched and eaten. Not only is it enjoyed for eating, but it also have various health benefits and is used in the medicinal applications, be it more traditional than commercial.
Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Planning

Difficulty

Advanced

Flowering time

Spring, Summer

Fruiting time

Summer

Harvesting

The entire head should be cut at ground level using a sharp knife. Blanching will keep the core white. Harvest the plants early if very hot weather or a hard frost is expected.

Propagation

Seed

Sowing time is during Spring and Summer. Space 30cm apart and sow 25 mm deep. Germination time is from 5-10 days.

Special features

Attracts useful insects

Flowers attract bees and butterflies.

Repels harmful insects

The plants are resistant to tipburn, bolting and bottom rot.

Pot plant

Can be grown in large containers with good drainage holes.

Indoor plant

Can be grown indoors to protect from frost, but enough sunlight, water and airflow is needed.

Special features

Origin

Asia Minor

Natural climate

Temperate

Environment

Light

Full Sun

Soil moisture

Moist

Soil type

Clay, Loam, Sand

Soil PH preference

Alkaline, Neutral

Frost hardiness

Half-Hardy

Uses

Medicinal

The leaves are used to maintain healthy mucus membranes and skin, and protect against lung and mouth cancers. A very beneficial tonic to the liver and digestive system.

Edible

Rosette or curled leaves are eaten raw in salad, boiled, steamed, sautéed, or cooked in soups, stews and mixed vegetable dishes. Blue flowers are used raw as salad, served as a garnish, or pickled.

Notes

Culinary

Personality

Family

Asteraceae

Flower colour

Purple

Scent

None

Problems

Pests include aphids, darkling beetles, flea beetles, leafminers, loopers, slugs and snails, and thrips. Diseases include anthracnose, bacteral soft rot, bottom rot, damping-off , downy mildew, sclerotinia blight, septoria blight.

Related Problems

Free download for your phone or tablet
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play

Knowledge and advice

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
Download on the App StoreGet it on Google Play