Paddle Kalanchoe

Kalanchoe luciae

Paddle Plant, Red Pancakes, Desert Cabbage, Dog Tongue, Pancake Plant, Northern White Lady, Flapjack Plant, Flipping Pancakes

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Paddle Plant (Kalanchoe luciae) 3 by Mokkie (CC BY-SA 4.0)
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Paddle Plant (Kalanchoe luciae) 3 by Mokkie (CC BY-SA 4.0)
1 of 7
This succulent species has large, thick, spatula- to circular-shaped leaves that have a wide reddish tinge along their edges. Younger leaves and stems have a white, powdery coating which acts as protection from the sun and harsh environments. The younger inner leaves are upright and parallel, as they age they slant slightly outwards and often develop wavy edges. The plant produces numerous offsets throughout its life, ensuring replacements.

Planning

Difficulty

Easy

Flowering time

Spring, Summer, Autumn, Winter

Fruiting time

Spring

Propagation

Cuttings

Cuttings root easily in well-draining mixtures.

Seed

Sow seed in sandy soil mix and keep moist.

Layering

New roots form where the succulent stem touches the soil. Cut off and replant.

Special features

Attracts birds

Nectar-rich flowers attrack birds like sunbirds

Attracts useful insects

Drought resistant

Indoor plant

Pot plant

Attractive flowers

Pretty yellow bell-shaped flowers.

Attractive leaves

The fleshy round leaves, resembling Flap Jacks, die back after flowering, but soon new ones emerge. The red border disappear in shade or with regular watering.

Attracts butterflies

Attracts bees

Special features

Origin

South Africa, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Kwa-Zulu Natal.

Natural climate

Mediterranean

Environment

Light

Full Sun, Partial Shade, Partial Sun

Soil moisture

Dry

Soil type

Loam, Sand

Soil PH preference

Neutral

Frost hardiness

Tender

Uses

Personality

Family

Crassulaceae

Flower colour

Green, Yellow

Scent

Mild

Problems

Slugs and snails as well as other nibbling insects.

Credits

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Kalanchoe luciae by Werner Voigt, Kirstenbosch National Botanical Garden, August 2005. Updated October 2017. Revised by Andrew Hankey, Walter Sisulu National Botanical Garden, August 2019 (Copyright South African National Biodiversity Institute, South Africa)