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A picture of a Silver Tree

Silver Tree

Leucadendron argenteum

Also known as

Cape Silvertree

Full Sun
Moderate care
Moderate watering
Tender

H4-H1c

RHS hardiness

-10°C

Minimum temperature

Expected size

Height
Spread

10m

Max

4m

5m

Min

2m

5 years to reach maturity

Flowering

  • spring
  • summer
  • autumn
  • winter

This plant has a mild fragrance

More images of Silver Tree

Leucadendron argenteum, hairy leaves.
Leucadendron argenteum, female (L) and male (R) tree.
Leucadendron argenteum, male flowerhead.
Leucadendron argenteum, female flowerhead.
L. argenteum flowerheads

Silver Tree Overview

The Silver tree is an erect, well-proportioned, ornamental tree, 7-10 m tall, with a stout trunk and thick, grey bark. The upright branches are covered with large lance-shaped leaves, which overlap each other up the stem, concealing the thick branches. The leaves are silver-grey, covered on both surfaces with thousands of tiny, soft, silvery hairs and fringed by long white hairs. The characteristic silver sheen of the leaves is caused by the hairs. The intensity of the sheen varies with the weather. They are at their most silver in hot, dry weather, when the hairs lie flat to protect the leaves from drying out. In wet weather they are not quite as dazzling, as the hairs stand more erect to allow for free air circulation. The flowers are in dense heads at the branch tips. The leaves that surround the flower heads do not change colour while the tree is in flower, but they open wider, thus catching the light at a different angle and shining brighter silver than the rest of the leaves. The Silver tree is an endangered plant species in the family Proteaceae, which is endemic to a small area of the Cape Peninsula, South Africa. They live 20 years. Uses: Ornamental garden specimen. Its beautiful silver foliage is used in floristry. Leaves have also long been collected, pressed and dried for decoration. The dried female cones are decorative and the small silver balls of the dried male flower heads are used

Common problems with Silver Tree

Susceptible to soil borne root rotting fungus, Phytophthora and also attacked by a beetle, the Silver Tree Borer, also known as the Protea Jewel Beetle, Sphenoptera sinuosa, which bores tunnels in the roots and increases the chances of Phytopthora infection.

Silver Tree Companion Plants

Plant with protea and fynbos species.

How to harvest Silver Tree

Generally not harvested.

How to propagate Silver Tree

Cuttings

Short cuttings from the tip of the branches can be made in autumn.

Seed

Sow seeds in Autumn in trays with a well-drained medium, place in a sunny position. Broadcast the seed evenly, firm down, cover with 10mm of clean sand or milled bark, 3-6 weeks to germinate.

Special features of Silver Tree

Attracts useful insects

The pleasant scent of the flower attracts small beetles that do the job of pollination.

Drought resistant

Once established the plants only need small amounts of water.

Pioneer

Attractive flowers

Males are pinkish-silver in bud, and yellow and pink when open. Females have yellow-orange flowers.

Other uses of Silver Tree

Grown for their flower heads from autumn to spring and for their foliage.

Ornamental

Ornamental garden specimen. Its beautiful silver foliage is used in floristry. Leaves have also long been collected, pressed and dried for decoration. The dried female cones are decorative and the small silver balls of the dried male flower heads are used in floristry and by crafters.

Leucadendrons

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