Water-logging

Water-logging, Overwatering, Waterlogging, Water Damage, Water, Over Watering

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Root rot due to waterlogging
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In the garden, overwatering and water-logging are infrequent, but it's still possible in some cases. For example, if your garden incorporates clay soil, this can sometimes be a problem for water drainage. Damage is much more apparent indoors when houseplants receive too much water. The damage occurs when too much water in the soil media prevents enough Oxygen and Carbon Dioxide from entering and leaving the root system. From here, the roots begin to rot and ultimately die. Read on for prevention tips and treatments!
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Symptoms

Yellowing of leaves.
A general reduction in growth may be evident.
Leaves produce dry, brown patches.
Over watering and water-logging can cause root rot.

Biological treatment

If you believe you've overwatered your houseplant, the first step would be to inspect the plant for root-rot. If roots are a little smelly, brown and soft, remove all of these with scissors. Leave any roots still firm and white. If you end up removing a lot, it's suggested to remove equal part of the foliage so the roots can effectively do their job for the above-ground parts of the plant. Replace the soil with new, and place in a new pot. It's proposed that springling cinnamon on the soils surface before watering can help fight fungal and bacterial infections.

Prevention

Indoors, always research plant watering specifications. Browse the Candide Knowledgebase for your chosen plant, and all the information you'll ever need is provided! You can always ask the wonderful community for advice if you ever feel unsure. If your garden has majority clay soil, it may struggle to drain water effectively, resulting in water-logging. You can help prevent water-logging by incorporating sand or grit into the soil media. You can further improve drainage with the addition of well-rotted farm manure, garden or mushroom compost. In doing so, it further improves the absorption of water by the sand or grit. Grit/ sand and organic matter can either be mixed into the soil or, applied as a mulch. The mulch will be worked into the ground naturally by soil-dwelling organisms! If waterlogging is a frequent problem in your garden, it might be worth creating an incline or mound so water can drain better. If this won't work, drainage systems can be installed as the last resource.
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Plant Knowledge

Search our ever-growing knowledge base to find plants and information. Find out about pests and diseases you should be keeping an eye out for. Watch How to videos or follow step by step guides for tasks in the garden. Free download for your phone or tablet.
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